© 2017 by Shizue Seigel. San Francisco, CA

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Double Vision statement

Japanese American artist and writer Shizue Seigel blurs the boundaries between photography, painting, found objects and poetry to explore shifting planes of multicultural identity. In today's evolving world, where

minorities are the majority, the complexity of our stories is our American story.

By exploring little-known narratives from many cultures, the artist invites viewers to ponder “Who is American? What is progress? What are the sources of our values, and how do we move forward in a world where no one nation can claim global domination?”

 

The United States is a nation in transition in a world in flux, backing our way out of the evolutionary dead-end of a fossil-fueled, consumerist economy. True divisions are not based on gender, class or national origin but

the widening gap between the givers and takers, the informed and the oblivious, the empowered and the passive.

It's an exciting time to be alive, and to contribute to the on-going national

conversation. To do so effectively, we must understand the complex richness of our collective cultural and political histories and empower ourselves as individuals to work for positive change.

Poetry

some girls

 

What do you mean, “Go for it”?

how can you say,  “Speak up”?

Nobody taught me how.

 

Nice girls are agreeable.

Nice girls are patient.

We don’t make mistakes

or act without permission.

 

Nobody taught me

to love the terrible freedom, the wild solitude.

I did eveything they told me to.

 

“Be patient,” they said.

“Compromise, co-operate, wait your turn.”

 

Hesitant and yielding,

gentle flutter of downcast eyes.

Inside resentment builds, drop by bitter drop.Inside the wild bitch screams.

ethnic adjustments

 

Get this. I’m only

going to say it once:

I am not nor have I ever been

a Cherry Blossom queen

I did not nor do I plan to

bomb Pearl Harbor

I do not nor will I ever

wear a camera round my neck

 

No, I won’t walk on your back Or serve green tea,

Hell, I don’t even like rice.

 

Look closely. I’m not yellow inside or out.

My eyes don’t slant.

And I’m sure you’ve noticed I’m not polite.

 

So let’s go for a walk.

But don’t expect me

to walk ten steps behind.

In my world, men follow me.